Scenes we've seen before

Some of the scenes in The Hobbit are almost the same as some in The Lord of the Rings. I suppose that some of them was made on purpose, like Gandalf walking into the chandelier but I'm not so quite sure about others. I really should just place a big SPOILER sign over the entire blog since almost everything from now on will include scenes, conversations etc from The Hobbit. So if anyone hasn't seen The Hobbit yet, don't continue to read!
 
 
Caradhras/The Misty Mountains

When the Fellowship tried to cross Caradhras Saruman makes heavy masses of snow to fall down on the Fellowship. In The Hobbit the snow has been exchanged to stone and Saruman to stone giants. I don't complain about the plot, after all, this is what happends. What I don't like is that Peter Jackson has made these scenes almost the same. He could have done just some small alterations and the thing would've been settled, but no.
 
"You shall not pass"/Cracking the stone
 
We all know the famous "You shall not pass"-scene when Gandalf is fighting the Balrog and striking his staff unto the ground. In The Hobbit we see a scene which has some similarities. It might not be so clear as the example above but since "You shall not pass"-scene is so famous (and this scene from The Hobbit never really happened like this in the book) I'm not too pleased with it. So what is it that I'm talking about? Well, it's the troll-scene. When Gandalf appears on the big stone and strikes his staff unto the stone and breaking it in two so the sun can shine through. Too similar for me.
 
Sorry, I don't have time to come up with any more, I have some lovely chemistry to do... But I just thought this little video might be fun! The actors of the dwarfs in The Hobbit are answering some questions about Tolkien and The Hobbit. Some of them are really easy (I mean who doesn't know that Galadriel is the sword of Gandalf? :P ) but some are supprisingly difficult, especially if you're not born in the 60's.
 
 
 
Love,
Erunyauvë

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